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DESCRIPTOR LIST FOR APRICOT


Passport
Characterization and preliminary evaluation data
Further characterization and evaluation

The IBPGR now uses the following definitions in genetic resources documentation:

i) passport data (accession identifiers and information recorded by collectors);

ii) characterization (consists of recording those characters which are highly heritable, can be easily seen by the eye and are expressed in all environments);

iii) preliminary evaluation (consists of recording a limited number of additional traits thought desirable by a consensus of users of the particular crop).

Characterization and preliminary evaluation will normally be the responsibility of the curators, while further characterization and evaluation should be carried out by the plant breeder. The data from further evaluation should be fed back to the crop coordinator who will maintain a data file.

The following internationally accepted standards for the scoring or coding of descriptor states should be followed as indicated below:

a) measurements are made in metric units;

b) many descriptors which are continuously variable are recorded on a 1-9 scale. The authors of this list have sometimes described only a selection of the states, e.g. 3, 5 and 7 for such descriptors. where this has occurred the full range of codes is available for use by extension of the codes given or by interpolation between them - e.g. in 8. (Pest and disease susceptibility) 1 = extremely low susceptibility and 8 = high to extremely high susceptibility;

c) presence/absence of characters are scored as i (present) and 0 (absent);

d) for descriptors which are not generally uniform throughout the accession (e.g. mixed collection, genetic segregation) mean and standard deviation could be reported where the descriptor is continuous or mean and 'x' where the descriptor is discontinuous (frequencies can be recorded in the NOTES descriptor, 11);

e) when the descriptor is inapplicable, '0' is used as the descriptor value. For example, if an accession does not form flowers, a '0' would be scored for the following descriptor

Flower colour

1 White
2 Yellow
3 Red
4 Purple

f) blanks are used, for information not yet available;

g) standard colour charts e.g. Royal Horticultural Society Colour Chart, Methuen Handbook of Colour, Munsell Color Charts for Plant Tissues are strongly recommended for all ungraded colour characters. The precise chart used should be specified in the NOTES descriptor, 11.

For the observations on the fruit, 20 typical fruits should be selected out of a minimum of 40 from two trees.

All observations on the fruits should be made on fruits ripened on the

Passport


1. Accession data
2. Collection data

1. Accession data

INTRODUCTORY

1.1 ACCESSION NUMBER

This number serves as a unique identifier for an accession at a given site and is assigned by the curator of a particular genebank site when an accession is entered into the site genebank. It must not be re-used even if the accession is lost. Letters should occur before the number to identify the genebank or national system (e.g. PI indicates an accession within the USA system, and EC indicates an accession within the CEC Fruit Genetic Resources Scheme.) A site may choose to use a Genetic Resource Scheme (GRS) ACCESSION NUMBER (see 1.4) as the only unique identifier.

1.2 DONOR NAME (= Source of acquisition)

The name and address of the person or institute responsible for donating the germplasm to the genebank collection at the site (see 1.13) at which the plants are held

1.3 DONOR IDENTIFICATION NUMBER

The number (or name) assigned by the person or institute above (1.2) donating the accession to the site specified at 1.14

1.4 OTHER NUMBERS ASSOCIATED WITH THE ACCESSION (see also 1.18 and 2.1)

Other identification number known to exist in other collections for this accession, e.g. CEC Genetic Resources Scheme* (EC) number or United States Plant Inventory (PI) number. EC and PI numbers serve as unique identifiers for an accession in a particular GRS, and must not be re-used; they are assigned by the EC or PI coordinator, and not by the site curator

1.4.1 *EC number (CEC GRS accession number)

* Basic EC Apricot Descriptors
1.4.2 PI number (United States Plant Inventory accession number)

1.4.3 etc.

1.5 SCIENTIFIC NAME (Use Primus armeniaca for the cultivated apricot)

1.5.1 *Genus (e.g. Prunus)

1.5.2 *Species (e.g. armeniaca)

1.5.3 *Subspecies (if applicable)

1.5.4 Bot. var. (if applicable)

For complex hybrids, refer to 1.12

1.6 PEDIGREE OF ACCESSIONS

1.6.1 *Female parent (of the accession)

1.6.2 *Male parent (of the accession)

1.6.3 Mother of female parent

1.6.4 Father of female parent

1.6.5 Mother of male parent

1.6.6 Father of male parent

1.6.7 Nomenclature and designations

Identities and additional pedigree assigned to breeder's material

1.7 ACQUISITION DATE

The month and year in which the accession entered the collection, expressed numerically, e.g. June = 06, 1981 = 1981

1.7.1 Month

1.7.2 Year

1.8 DATE OF LAST REGENERATION OR MULTIPLICATION

The month and year expressed numerically, e.g. October = 10, 1978 = 1978

1.8.1 Month

1.8.2 Year

1.9 ACCESSION SIZE

Approximate number of seeds or plants of accession in collection

1.10 NUMBER OF TIMES ACCESSION REGENERATED

Number of regenerations or multiplications since original collection

1.11 TYPE OF MAINTENANCE

1 Vegetative
2 Seed
3 Pollen
4 Tissue culture
5 More than one type (specify in NOTES descriptor, 11)
1.12 GENETIC ORIGIN
1 Self pollination
2 Infraspecific hybrid
3 Interspecific hybrid
4 Clonal selection
5 Bud spontaneous mutation
6 Bud induced mutation
7 Open pollination
8 etc.
Specify further information on complex hybrids in the NOTES descriptor, 11.

SITE SPECIFIC

1.13 *COUNTRY WHERE MAINTAINED

Code letters for country in which plants are grown. Use the three letter abbreviations supported by the Statistical Office of the United Nations. Copies of the abbreviations are available from the IBPGR. Secretariat and have been published in the FAO/IBPGR Plant Genetic Resources Newsletter No. 49

e.g.

GRC Greece


USA United States of America


1.14 *SITE WHERE MAINTAINED

Institute at which plants are grown. (If codes are used, they must be unique for a particular country and, to avoid duplication, should be communicated to IBPGR.)

e.g.

ANGS Station de Recherches d'Arboriculture Fruitière, Angers


EMRS East Mailing Research Station, Kent


FRNZ Istituto di Coltivazioni Arboree, Firenze


1.15 CURATOR

The officer responsible for maintaining the genetic resources material held at the site specified above

1.16 *LOCAL NAME

The name by which the cultivar or species is listed at the above site. This may be either some combination of the Genetic Identifiers (1.22 and 1.23) or a synonym

1.17 *LOCAL CLONE/MUTANT/VARIANT NAME

The clone or mutant name of the cultivar or species (if any) by which it is identified at the above site. This may be either the internationally accepted name (1.23) or a synonym

1.18 LOCAL PLANT NUMBER

This identifies a single plant within a population of plants having the same site accession number. It may be any combination of plot identity, row number, and tree position within the row

1.19 DISTRIBUTION

1 Unlimited
2 Limited - (specify restrictions in the NOTES descriptor, 11)

1.20 *YEAR OF PROBABLE DISCARD

Enter year that tree(s) will probably be discarded, e.g. 1988. Regeneration of genebank accessions should take place at least two years before the year of probable discard

1.21 YEAR TREE PLANTED (e.g. 1972) FURTHER IDENTIFIERS

1.22 *GENETIC NAME

The name of the cultivar or species as internationally accepted or defined by the Genetic Resources Scheme coordinator e.g. Blenheim

1.23 *GRS CLONE/MUTANT/VARIANT NAME

The internationally accepted name (if any) of the clone or mutant of the cultivar or species, e.g. Early Blenheim.

1.24 PATENT NUMBER (or Plants Variety Rights Number)

Patented cultivars-

record the patent number or, if the patent number is not known, write '+'

Non-patented cultivars-

record as '0'


1.25 SYNONYMS

Other useful names (excluding those occurring above) in alphabetical order

2. Collection data

2.1 COLLECTOR'S NUMBER

Original number assigned by collector of the sample normally composed of the name or initials of the collector(s) followed by a number. This item is essential for identifying duplicates held in different collections and should always accompany sub-samples wherever they are sent

2.2 COLLECTING INSTITUTE

Institute or person collecting/sponsoring the original sample

2.3 DATE OF COLLECTION OF ORIGINAL SAMPLE

Expressed numerically, e.g. March = 03, 1980 = 1980

2.3.1 Month

2.3.2 Year

2.4 *COUNTRY OF COLLECTION OR COUNTRY WHERE CULTIVAR/VARIETY BRED (=Origin)

Use the three letter abbreviations supported by the Statistical Office of the United Nations. (see 1.13)

2.5 PROVINCE/STATE

Name of the administrative subdivision of the country in which the sample was collected

2.6 LOCATION OF COLLECTION SITE

2.6.1 Collected in the wild

Number of kilometres and direction from nearest town village or map grid reference (e.g. IZMIR7S means 7 km south of Izmir)

2.6.2 Postal address

For material originating at a clearly identifiable postal address

2.7 LATITUDE OF COLLECTION SITE

Degrees and minutes followed by N (North) or S (South), e.g. 1030S

2.8 LONGITUDE OF COLLECTION SITE

Degrees and minutes followed by E (East) or W (West), e.g. 7625W

2.9 ALTITUDE OF COLLECTION SITE

Elevation above sea level in metres

2.10 COLLECTION SOURCE

1 Wild
2 Farm land
3 Farm store
4 Backyard
5 Village market
6 Commercial market
7 Institute
8 Other (specify in the NOTES descriptor, 11)
2.11 STATUS OF SAMPLE
1 Wild
2 Weedy
3 Breeders' line
4 Primitive cultivar (landrace)
5 Advanced cultivar (bred)
6 Other (specify in the NOTES descriptor, 11)
2.12 LOCAL/VERNACULAR NAME

Name given by farmer to cultivar/landrace/weed

2.13 NUMBER OF PLANTS SAMPLED

Approximate number of plants collected (sampled) in the field to produce this accession

2.14 PHOTOGRAPH

Was a photograph taken of the accession or environment at collection?

0 = No
+ = Yes
2.15 HERBARIUM SPECIMEN
0 = No
+ = Yes
2.16 TYPE OF SAMPLE
1 Vegetative
2 Seed
3 Roth
2.17 NATURE OF VEGETATIVE SAMPLE
1 Cuttings - for grafting
2 Cuttings - for rooting
3 Rooted plants
4 Tissue culture
5 Other (specify in the NOTES descriptor, 11)
2.18 *VIRUS DISEASE STATUS (including mycoplasma)
1 Virus disease free; specify viruses known to be absent in the NOTES descriptor, 11 and year of last virus test

2 Virus disease present; specify viruses present in the NOTES descriptor, 11 and year of last virus test

3 Not tested

4 Virus free by treatment

2.19 *END USE, GENERAL
1 Fruit use
2 Plant use
3 Both
2.20 *FRUIT USE
1 Scion cultivar - dessert
2 Scion cultivar - processing including distilling
3 Dual or multipurpose consumption
4 Other (specify in the NOTES descriptor, 11)
2.21 *PLANT USE
1 Clonal rootstock
2 Clonal interstock
3 Seedling rootstock
4 Ornamental/pollinator
5 Dual or multipurpose use
6 Botanical (wild) species
7 Other (specify in the NOTES descriptor, 11)
2.22 OTHER NOTES FROM COLLECTOR

Collectors should record ecological/climatic information. For cultivated crops, cultivation practices should be recorded

Characterization and preliminary evaluation data

3. SITE DATA

3.1 COUNTRY OF CHARACTERIZATION AND PRELIMINARY EVALUATION

See 1.13 for code

3.2 SITE (RESEARCH INSTITUTE)

See 1.14 for coding procedure

3.3 NAME OF PERSON IN CHARGE OF CHARACTERIZATION

3.4 ROOTSTOCK

Name of rootstock on which accession is grafted (if any)

3.5 CONDITION OF TREE

Choose the one condition that best fits the accession

1 Dying
2 Old - declining
3 Mature - diseased
4 Mature - non-vigorous
5 Mature - vigorous
6 Young - not yet bearing
7 Healthy - cropping poorly
8 Healthy - cropping well
3.6 *CROPPING

A preliminary assessment of 'Cropping efficiency' (descriptor 6.2.4)

3 Cropping poorly
5 Intermediate
7 Cropping well
4. PLANT DATA

4.1 VEGETATIVE

4.1.1 *Propagation method

Suitable method(s) employed for multiplication (0 = No, + = Yes)

4.1.1.1 Grafting (including budding)

4.1.1.2 Hardwood cuttings

4.1.1.3 Softwood cuttings

4.1.1.4 Stool beds

4.1.1.5 Layering

4.1.1.6 Micropropagation

4.1.1.7 Seed

4.1.1.8 Etc.

4.1.2 *Chromosome number

4.1.3 Leaf size (on one-year shoot)



Reference

1

Extremely small

Hussein

3

Small

Barese, Early Blady

5

Medium

Bulida, Rouge de Roussilon

7

Large

Hatif Colomer

9

Extremely large

Moniqui, Palsteyn, Del Pittore


4.1.4 Leaf blade shape: ratio length/breadth (on one-year shoot)




Reference

1


< 0.76


2


0.76-0.85


3

Oblate

0.86-0.95

Bulida

4


0.96-1.05

Cafona

5

Rounded

1.06-1.15

Luizet, Curtis

6


1.16-1.25

Hatif Colomer

7

Elongated

1.26-1.35

Sancastrese, Goldcot

8


1.36-1.45

Precoce d'Imola

9


> 1.45



4.1.5 Petiole length



Reference

3

Short

Royal,



S. Francesco, Rapareddo

5

Medium

Cafona

7

Long

D'Alessandria, Eten Bey


4.1.6 Petiole glands number



Reference

1

Usually 1-2

Rouget de Sernhac, Rival, Goldcot

2

Usually 3-4

Cafona, Mono, Hat if Colomer

3

Usually 5-6

Canino, Moniqui

4

Usually more than 6



4.2 INFLORESCENCE AND FRUIT

4.2.1 *Season of flowering

Date of beginning of flowering (10% of flowers open)



Reference

1

Extremely early

Setacciara

2

Very early

Sancastrese

3

Early

Hat if Colomer, Morden 604

4

Early/intermediate

Rouge de Roussillon, Moniqui

5

Intermediate

Cafona, Goldcot

6

Intermediate/late

Bergeron, Harcot

7

Late

Polonais, S. Francesco, Harlayne

8

Very late

Harogem, Harglow

9

Extremely late

Scromnyi, Zard


4.2.2 *Harvest maturity

Season of maturity for picking, when available, average maturity in terms of days post blossom can be recorded in the NOTES descriptor, 11



Reference

I

Extremely early

Patriarca Temprano, Ouardi, Early Samarkand

2

Very early

Sayeb

3

Early

Hatif Colomer, Harcot

4

Early/mid season

Canino

5

Mid-season

Cafona, Screara, Hargrand

6

Mid season/late

Peeka, Sancastrese, Harogem, Harglow

7

Late

Rouge de Roussillon, Reale d'Imola, Harlayne

8

Very late

Polonais, Bergeron, Royal

9

Extremely late

Tardif de Bordaneil



type 2


4.2.3 *Flesh colour



Reference

1

White-greenish

China n.1, Amban

2

White

Moniqui

3

Light cream

Zerdeli, Japan's Early

4

Cream

Patriarca Temprano, Khurmai

5

Yellow

Canino, Goldcot

6

Light orange

Harcot, Erevan, Dima,

7

Orange

Cafona, Rouge de Roussillon, Harglow

8

Deep orange

Luizet, Hatif Colomer, Palsteyn, Veecot, Harogem

9

Red

Shlor-tsiram


4.3 SEED

4.3.1 *Kernel taste

Taste of dried kernel and degree of bitterness



Reference

1

Sweet

Luizet, Reale d'Imola, Harcot, Hungarian Best, Cacak's Gold

2

Weak bitterness

Monique, Rouge de Sernah

3

Strong bitterness

Canino, Hatif Colomer


4.3.2 *Separation of stone



Reference

3

Clinging

Precoce di Toscana, China n.1

5

Semi-clinging

Tardif de Bordaneil

7

Free

Hargrand, Peeka

Further characterization and evaluation

5. SITE DATA

5.1 COUNTRY OF FURTHER CHARACTERIZATION AND EVALUATION See 1.13 for code

5.2 SITE (RESEARCH INSTITUTE) See 1.14 for code

5.3 NAME OF PERSON IN CHARGE OF EVALUATION

5.4 ROOTSTOCK

Name of the rootstock on which the accession is grafted (if any)

6. PLANT DATA

6.1 VEGETATIVE

SCIONS GRAFTED ON ROOTSTOCKS OR SELF-ROOTED

6.1.1 Tree habit (of branches)

Natural habit of an untrained, non-juvenile tree



Reference

1

Extremely upright

Japan's early

3 4

Upright

Reale d'Imola Bulida, Bergeron, Harcot

5 6

Spreading

Pineapple, Hargrand Harglow, Hungarian Best, Harlayne

7 8

Drooping

Palsteyn Cacak's Gold

9

Weeping



6.1.2 Tree vigour

Based on height and spread measurements of adult trees on their own roots, or relative to reference cultivars on the same rootstock (use reference cultivars or species on a common rootstock for each site)



Reference

1

Extremely weak

Sub-zero

3

Weak

Canetta

5

Intermediate

Hatif Colomer, Sunglo, Cacak's Gold

7

Strong

Early Orange, Harlayne

9

Extremely strong

Stella, Manchu, Hungarian Best, Moniqui


6.1.3 Scion/rootstock compatibility

The compatibility of a scion accession on the rootstock named in 5.4 or on one of the following rootstocks (references in Table 1)

Based on a 1-9 scale where:

3 Poor
5 Intermediate
7 Good

6.1.3.1 On the rootstock named in 5.4

6.1.3.2 Peach seedlings

6.1.3.3 Myrobalan M.B.

6.1.3.4 G.F. 8.1 (P. marianna)

6.1.3.5 Other (specify in the NOTES descriptor, 11)

Table 1. Scion/rootstock compatibility (Reference varieties)


6.1.3.2
Peach seedlings

6.1.3.3
Myrobalan M.B.

6.1.3.4
G.P.8.1

3 (Poor)

Moniqui

Canino

Canino

5 (Intermediate)

Can i no



7 (Good)

Cafona

Cafona

Cafona


6.1.4 Coloration of shoot tip

Anthocyanin coloration on young shoots (10-15 cm long) in springtime



Reference

3

Weak

Alpha

5

Medium

Boccuccia

7

Strong

Hat if Colomer, Harcot


6.1.5 Tree chilling requirement

Information concerning the method of recording this character must be included in the NOTES descriptor, 11



Reference

3

Low

Currot, Galtha Rocha

5

Intermediate

Canino

6


Hungarian Best

7

High

Moorpark, Luizeet

8


Oranzevokrasnyi

9

Extremely high



6.2 INFLORESCENCE AND FRUIT

SCIONS GRAFTED ON ROOTSTOCKS OR SELF-ROOTED

6.2.1 Flower size



Reference

3

Small

Hatif Colomer

5

Medium

Reale d'Imola

7

Large

Barese, Amabile Vecchioni


6.2.2 Self-compatibility of flowers



Reference

1

Incompatible

Moongold, Sungold, Earliril,

2

Compatible only under special condition

Boccuccia, Pazza, Nonno

3

Compatible

Cafona, Harlayne, Hungarian Best


6.2.3 *Bearing habit

Predominant distribution of flower buds



Reference

1

Or spurs

Sunglo

2

On spurs and on year old shoots one

Canino, Hatif Colomer

3

On one year old shoots

Prevete


6.2.4 Cropping efficiency (Productivity)

The yield per unit area of land relative to other cultivars on the same rootstock, under the same management system and at the same site



Reference

1

Extremely low

Early Orange

3

Low

Luizet

5

Intermediate

Veecot, Harcot, Hargrand

7

High

Hatif Colomer, Goldcot

8

Very high

Haggith

9

Extremely high



6.2.5 *Fruit size

Average weight of fruits. Information on the uniformity of size can be recorded in the NOTES descriptor, 11




Reference

1

Extremely small

(< 20 g)

Millioner, Early Samarkand

2

Very small

(20-30 g)

Haggith

3

Small

(31-40 g)

Blanca de Murcia, Precoce Gialla

4

Small/medium

(41-45 g)

Hatif Colomer

5

Medium

(46-55 g)

Cafona, Harglow, Harogem

6

Medium/large

(56-60 g)

Canino, Harcot

7

Large

(61-70 g)

Luizet, Goldrich

8

Very large

(71-85 g)

Moniqui, Polonais

9

Extremely large

(> 85 g)

Tomis, Palsteyn, Hargrand


6.2.6 *Fruit shape (frontal view)

See shape outlines in Figure 1



Reference

1

Round

Cafona

2

Round/flat

Currot, Patriarca Temprano, Hargrand

3

Elliptic

Prevete, Sunglo

4

Ovate

Baracca, Harcot, Harlayne

5

Triangular (heart shaped)

Reale d'Imola, Luizet

6

Oblong (rectangular)

Hatif Colomer, Veecot, Harogem

Figure 1. Fruit shape (frontal view)

1 Round

2 Round flat

3 Elliptic

4 Ovate

5 Triangular

6 Oblong

6.2.7 Cavity depth



Reference

3

Shallow

Rouge de Roussillon

5

Intermediate

Royal

7

Deep

Hat if Colomer


6.2.8 Suture



Reference

3

Shallow

Rouge de Roussillon

5

Intermediate

Peeka

7

Deep

Henderson


6.2.9 Symmetry along the suture




Reference

0

Predominantly

asymmetric

Peeka, Boccuccia

+

Predominantly

symmetric

De Jouy


6.2.10 Apex



Reference

1

Depressed

Earliril

2

Flat

Hat if Colomer

3

Rounded

Luizet

4

Pointed

Reale d'Imola


6.2.11 Fruit attractiveness

This is a subjective factor, varying between regions and between experts



Reference

1

Extremely poor

Stella, Zerdeli, Doty

3

Poor

Haggith, Racovski

5

Fair

Goldcot, Kecskemeter Rose, Hargrand, Vivagold, Velvaglo

7

Good

Veecot, Harcot, Harglow, Harlayne, Hungarian Best, Stark Early Orange

9

Extremely good

Harogem, Chantung


6.2.12 Skin pubescence



Reference

0

Absent (Glabrous)

Glattschalige Frühmarille

+

Present (Pubescent)

Most cultivars


6.2.13 Ground colour

Ground colour of the skin of fully mature fruit



Reference

1

Green-yellowish

Grüne Spätmarille

2

Light cream

China n.1

3

Cream

Moniqui, Piet Cillie, Khurmai

4

Yellow

Canino, Goldcot

5

Light orange

Rouge de Roussillon

6

Orange

Hatif Colomer, Luizet, Palsteyn

7

Dark orange

Veecot, Harogem


6.2.14 Over colour (Blush)

Over colour of the skin of fully mature fruit. Additional information can be recorded in the NOTES descriptor, 11



Reference

0

None

Canino

1

Trace

Rakowski, California

2

Slight

Veecot, Early Large

3


Harglow, Hargrand

4

Mottled

Melitopolska Rana, Holub

5

Intermediate red

Palsteyn, Precoce de Tyrinthe

6


Harcot, Harlayne

7

Mostly red

Bergeron, Harogem, Blenril

8


Kecskemeter Rose, Cacak's Gold, Red Muskadine

9

Full red

Oleg Kojevoi


6.2.15 *Eating quality

A combined assessment of flavour, acidity, sweetness, aroma and astringency at optimum eating time



Reference

1

Extremely poor

Hellin

2


Precoce de Tyrinthe

3

Poor

Morden 604

4


Hatif Colomer, Zerdeli

5

Fair

Canino, Goldrich

6


Luizet, Bergeron, Veecot

7

Good

Rouge de Roussillon, Harglow

8


Hargrand, Harlayne, Cacak's Gold

9

Excellent

Moniqui, Hungarian Best


6.2.16 Aroma



Reference

3

Little aroma

Hatif Colomer, Canino

5

Intermediate aroma

Goldcot

7

Rich aroma

De Jouy, Erevani


6.2.17 *Firmness of flesh



Reference

1

Extremely soft

Zerdeli, Viceroy

3

Soft

Canino, Goldcot

5

Medium

Rouge de Roussillon

7

Firm

Bergeron, Palsteyn

9

Extremely firm

Cacak's Gold, Kecskemeter Rose, Oleg Kojevoi, Harogem


6.2.18 Flesh juiciness



Reference

3

Dry


5

Intermediate


7

Juicy

Erevani, Hemskerke


6.2.19 Uniformity of ripening of fruit



Reference

1

Not uniform


2

Uniform

Cafona


6.2.20 Texture of flesh

The texture of the flesh of the fruit when ripe



Reference

1

Extremely coarse


3

Coarse

Bulida, Morden 604

5

Intermediate

Piet Cillie

7

Fine

Peeka, Hungarian Best

9

Extremely fine

Hargrand, Chantung


6.2.21 Skin cracking susceptibility



Reference

1

Extremely low

Goldcot, Hungarian Best, Cacak's Gold

3

Low

Veecot

5

Medium

Canino

7

High

Baracca

9

Extremely high

Blenril, Stella


6.2.22 Pitburn susceptibility



Reference

1

Very low

Amabile Vecchioni

3

Low


5

Intermediate


7

High

Canino, Jubileinyi Novoyi


6.3 STONE

6.3.1 Stone size



Reference

1

Extremely small

Zerdeli

2


De Jouy

3

Small

Henderson

5

Medium

Hat if Colomer

6


Hungarian Best

7

Large

Reale d'Imola

8

Very large

Large Early

9

Extremely large



6.3.2 Stone shape (lateral view) See Figure 2



Reference

1

Round

Canino, Hargrand

2

Ovate

Eten Bey

3

Oblong

Cibo del Paradiso

4

Elliptic

Precoce di Toscana

5

Elongated

Erevan

Figure 2. Stone shape (lateral view)

1 Round

2 Ovate

3 Oblong

4 Elliptic

6 Elongated

6.3.3 Stone surface



Reference

1

Smooth

P. armeniaca, P. siberica

2

Pitted

P. mume


7. STRESS SUSCEPTIBILITY

Based on the 1-9 scale, where

1 Extremely low susceptibility
3 Low susceptibility
5 Medium susceptibility
7 High susceptibility
9 Extreme susceptibility
7.1 LOW TEMPERATURE

Additional information concerning type of susceptibility can be recorded in the NOTES descriptor 11, i.e. minimum temperature without damage, differences in bud and wood susceptibility etc.

7.1.1 Low temperature - late autumn/early winter

7.1.2 Low temperature - mid-winter



Reference

1

Extremely hardy

Manchu, Mirsazdeli, Hindu-kush

3

Hardy

Sungold, Moongold, Harlayne, Goldcot, Kecskemeter Rose

5

Moderate

Veecot, Hargrand, Hungarian Best

7

Tender

Viceroy, Phelps

9

Extremely tender

Rival, Japan's Early


7.1.3 Low temperature - spring

Especially at critical stages in relation to flowering



Reference

1

Extremely hardy

Bergeron, Henderson, Kecskemeter Rose

3

Hardy

Rouge de Roussillon, Farmingdale

5

Moderate

Hat if Colomer

7

Tender

Can i no

9

Extremely tender

Klabi Kadouri, Japan's Early


7.2 HIGH TEMPERATURE

7.3 DROUGHT

7.4 HIGH SOIL MOISTURE

7.5 CHLOROSIS

Induced by high lime content of the soil

8. PEST AND DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY

Based on 1-9 scale of general field susceptibility, where

3 Low susceptibility
5 Medium susceptibility
7 High susceptibility
If the race is known record in NOTES descriptor, 11. Hypersensitive (H) or Immune (I) reactions should also be recorded in the NOTES descriptor 11

8.1 PESTS

8.1.1 Capnodis tenebrionis

8.1.2 etc.

8.2 FUNGI

8.2.1

Podosphaera tridactyla -

powdery mildew




8.2.2

Monilinia laxa -

brown rot on blossom






Reference


1

Fruhe von Monplaisir


2

Precoce de Chision, New Jersey 23


3

Cot, Patriarca Temprano


4

Hat if Colomer, Marculesti 37/26


5

Polonais, Moniqui


6

Rouge de Roussillon


7

Poizat


8



9

Canino


8.2.3 Eutypa armeniacae


Reference

3


5


7

Moorpark


8.2.4 Cytospora cinta

canker



Reference

3

Hungarian Best, Cacak's Gold

5


7



8.2.5 Clasterosporium carpophilum


Reference

1

Reliable

3

Precoce de Chision, Arad

5

Hungarian Best,


Kecskemeter Rose

7


9



8.2.6 etc.

8.3 BACTERIA

8.3.1 Pseudomonas syringae


Reference

1

Esperen Early

3

Nikitski, Precoce de Chision

5

Hungarian Best,


Kecskemeter Rose

7

Nugget, Phelps

9

Japan's Early


8.3.2

Xanthomonas pruni -

black spot






Reference


1

Curtis, Alfred, Harcot


3

Goldcot


5

Hargrand, Harlayne


7

Harogem, Veecot


9

Rival


8.3.3 etc.

8.4 VIRUS AND MYCOPLASMA

8.4.1

Prunus virus 7

(plum pox)






Reference


3

Hungarian Best, Cacak's Gold


5



7

Blenril


8.4.2 etc.

9. ALLOENZYME COMPOSITION

These may prove to be useful tools for identifying duplicate accessions

10. CYTOLOGICAL CHARACTERS AND IDENTIFIERS GENES

11. *NOTES

Give additional information where descriptor state is noted as 'Other' as might appear in descriptors (e.g. 2.10). Also include here further relevant information (where necessary)

* Basic EC Apricot Description


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