Bioversity International: research for development in agricultural and tree biodiversity

Bioversity International's strategy

Bioversity International's strategy

To feed nine billion people by 2050, food availability needs to expand another 60% globally and up to 100% in developing countries. Continued investments in research on staple grains are essential as these crops will continue to provide a large share of global calories, but complementary approaches are needed to meet new global challenges:

  • Reduce global malnutrition
  • Adapt to climate change
  • Increase productivity and reduce risk
  • Address shrinking food diversity

Using and safeguarding agricultural and tree biodiversity can help meet these challenges.

Farm households and rural communities have long since used agricultural and tree biodiversity to diversify their diets, and to manage pests, diseases and weather-related stress. In the past however, policymakers and researchers considered these approaches economically uncompetitive.

More recently, scientific evidence has demonstrated that agricultural and tree biodiversity, used in combination with novel technologies and approaches, has much to offer in addressing these challenges.  It is also being increasingly recognized as a tool to achieve the global sustainable development goals.

Bioversity International Initiatives

Partners

We work with partners in low-income countries in different regions where agricultural and tree biodiversity can contribute to improved nutrition, resilience, productivity and climate change adaptation.

We are also a member of the CGIAR Consortium, a global partnership for a food-secure future. 

Meet our partners

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