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Bioversity International's mission is to deliver scientific evidence, management practices and policy options to use and safeguard agricultural and tree biodiversity to sustainable food and nutrition security.

The Central and South America region comprises 36 independent countries and territories. They harbour a huge range of climates and topography, from sub-polar climates in the south and the mountains, through temperate and sub-tropical areas, deserts, savannas and tropical forests.

The diversity of physical conditions and human societies have combined to give the region an unparalleled wealth of biological, agricultural and cultural diversity including many neglected and underutilized crops with the potential to feed the world and improve livelihoods.

Bioversity International is working with partners in the Americas where agricultural biodiversity can contribute to improved nutrition, resilience, productivity and climate change adaptation.

Where we work
Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Peru

Meet the team

Contact

For details of how to contact our offices in the Americas, click here.

Alternatively contact our Regional Representative, Central and South America:
Marleni Ramirez

Bringing forgotten crops back to the table

Scaling up efforts to incorporate agrobiodiversity into food systems in Brazil, Kenya, Sri Lanka and Turkey.
 

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Bringing our forests back to life

Bioversity International and partners are guiding resilient forest restoration efforts by collecting lessons learned and developing decision-support tools, in Latin America and beyond.
 

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Local foods – a strategic asset for healthy diets

Deploying the potential of seasonal fruits and vegetables as strategic assets for healthy diets in Kenya, Guatemala, Mali, and Vietnam.
 

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A climate change atlas for Central America

The World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) in collaboration with Bioversity International and The Tropical Agricultural Research and Higher Education Center (CATIE) has published an Atlas titled ‘Suitability of key Central American agroforestry species under future climates’.

The Atlas presents current and future suitability maps for 54 species that are commonly used as shade in agroforestry systems in Central America. "It is important to know where a species remains suitable under future climatic conditions to be able to give practical advice to farmers and tree growers” said Kauê de Sousa of Bioversity International who is the main author of the study. 

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Strategic Action Plan for Mesoamerica

Bioversity International and partners spent over a year gathering data and consulting with more than 100 regional stakeholders to develop an action plan to strengthen the role of plant genetic resources in adapting to climate change in Mesoamerica. The result, a 10-year roadmap known as 'SAPM – Strategic action plan to strengthen conservation and use of Mesoamerican plant genetic resources in adapting agriculture to climate change'.

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News from Central and South America:

Farmers in a Honduran village play AgroDuos as part of a participatory research project for bean breeding, led by Bioversity International. AgroDuos players sometimes need to make difficult decisions. In this case, the farmer must choose what's more important: Good taste of the beans, or nice growth habit of the plants?
Credit: Bioversity International/J. Steinke

Participatory research is a serious game

On a warm afternoon in a small farming village in Honduras, half a dozen farmers sit with a visitor from an NGO they’ve worked with before. They’re...

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New paper links farmers' perceptions of crop diversity and adaptation to climate change

Farmers in the Andean highlands are facing more unpredictable drought, frost, hail, and pest and disease outbreaks under climate change. A study by...

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Different stages of restoration of seasonally dry tropical forest in Colombia. credit: Luis Gonzalo Moscoso Higuita

A tool to guide species and seed selection for the restoration of seasonally dry tropical forest in Colombia

Making sure that native species and seed sources are site-adapted requires a certain degree of scientifically-based decision making capacity, which...

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Mahogany tree after 10 years, Mexico. Credit: Bioversity International/L. Snook

Restoring productivity and biodiversity in tropical forests by mimicking natural disasters

Laura Snook, Coordinator of Management and Conservation of Forest and Tree Resources, CGIAR Research Programme on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry,...

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Mainstreaming biodiversity for nutrition in Brazil

Daniela Moura de Oliveira Beltrame, National Project Coordinator, Biodiversity for Food and Nutrition, explains why Brazil is putting diverse native...

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Jonathan Steinke receives the Hans H Rutherford Fiat Panis award at Tropentag 2016. Credit: Tropentag

Fiat panis award for thesis research on citizen science for climate change adaptation in Honduras

During Tropentag 2016 held in Vienna, Jonathan Steinke from Humboldt University Berlin, Germany, received the fiat panis Hans H Ruthenberg graduate...

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Course participants learned about a new methodology – called ‘tricot’ as an abbreviation from ‘triadic comparisons of technologies’ – that allows to efficiently test new technologies involving farmers as citizen scientists.
Credit: Bioversity International/J. van Etten

Central American professionals learn about farmer citizen science for climate adaptation

79 professionals from NGOs, farmer organizations and research institutes in Nicaragua, Honduras and Guatemala learned about an exciting methodology...

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Banana plantation worker in Colombia. Credit: CIAT/N. Palmer

Crank it up! Researchers discover that banana plants enjoy thermotherapy

Bioversity International and other CGIAR Research Program on Roots, Tubers and Bananas scientists have discovered several thermotherapy-related...

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From dish to podium – it’s about a lot more than just sports in Rio

Brazil is not only home to the world’s best beach volleyball team but also the planet’s greatest plant biodiversity, representing around 15 to 20% of...

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Multi-functional landscape in Turrialba, Costa Rica. A hydropower dam manages water flows and electricity. A mix of farmland and forest can also be observed.  Credit: Bioversity International/C.Zanzanaini

Partnering with Costa Rica to help farmers face climate change

Bioversity International partners with Costa Rica to find new approaches to agriculture that take into account the variables of a changing climate.

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