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Bioversity International's mission is to deliver scientific evidence, management practices and policy options to use and safeguard agricultural and tree biodiversity to sustainable food and nutrition security.

The Central and South America region comprises 36 independent countries and territories. They harbour a huge range of climates and topography, from sub-polar climates in the south and the mountains, through temperate and sub-tropical areas, deserts, savannas and tropical forests.

The diversity of physical conditions and human societies have combined to give the region an unparalleled wealth of biological, agricultural and cultural diversity including many neglected and underutilized crops with the potential to feed the world and improve livelihoods.

Bioversity International is working with partners in the Americas where agricultural biodiversity can contribute to improved nutrition, resilience, productivity and climate change adaptation.

Where we work
Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Peru

Meet the team

Contact

For details of how to contact our offices in the Americas, click here.

Alternatively contact our Regional Representative, Central and South America:
Marleni Ramirez

Bringing forgotten crops back to the table

Scaling up efforts to incorporate agrobiodiversity into food systems in Brazil, Kenya, Sri Lanka and Turkey.
 

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Bringing our forests back to life

Bioversity International and partners are guiding resilient forest restoration efforts by collecting lessons learned and developing decision-support tools, in Latin America and beyond.
 

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Local foods – a strategic asset for healthy diets

Deploying the potential of seasonal fruits and vegetables as strategic assets for healthy diets in Kenya, Guatemala, Mali, and Vietnam.
 

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A climate change atlas for Central America

The World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) in collaboration with Bioversity International and The Tropical Agricultural Research and Higher Education Center (CATIE) has published an Atlas titled ‘Suitability of key Central American agroforestry species under future climates’.

The Atlas presents current and future suitability maps for 54 species that are commonly used as shade in agroforestry systems in Central America. "It is important to know where a species remains suitable under future climatic conditions to be able to give practical advice to farmers and tree growers” said Kauê de Sousa of Bioversity International who is the main author of the study. 

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Strategic Action Plan for Mesoamerica

Bioversity International and partners spent over a year gathering data and consulting with more than 100 regional stakeholders to develop an action plan to strengthen the role of plant genetic resources in adapting to climate change in Mesoamerica. The result, a 10-year roadmap known as 'SAPM – Strategic action plan to strengthen conservation and use of Mesoamerican plant genetic resources in adapting agriculture to climate change'.

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News from Central and South America:

Multi-functional landscape in Turrialba, Costa Rica. A hydropower dam manages water flows and electricity. A mix of farmland and forest can also be observed.  Credit: Bioversity International/C.Zanzanaini

Partnering with Costa Rica to help farmers face climate change

Bioversity International partners with Costa Rica to find new approaches to agriculture that take into account the variables of a changing climate.

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Cooperation and competition to conserve native diversity in Peru

As part of an incentive scheme in Peru to conserve quinoa biodiversity, farming communities received rewards, such as mattresses and spades, for...

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La cooperación y la competencia para conservar la diversidad nativa en Perú

Como parte de un esquema de incentivos para conservar la biodiversidad de quinua en el Perú, comunidades agrícolas recibieron recompensas, como palas...

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Pupunha bunches (Bactris gasipaes)

Putting biodiversity back on the menu in Brazil

New Ordinance signed on Sociobiodiversity will help to increase knowledge and promote sustainable use of native biodiversity

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Quinoa varieties conserved by Doña Adeleiva Castillo , a custodian farmer.  She conserves 120 varieties of quinoa on her farm in the Peruvian Andes in memory of her son who died tragically in a motorcycle accident. Please credit:  Bioversity International/A. Camacho

Q is for quinoa: going with the diversity grain

Bioversity International scientists Adam Drucker and Marleni Ramirez highlight in the Economist the importance of going with the diversity grain when...

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Bioversity International staff in Costa Rica being trained to install and maintain weather stations. Bioversity International/G. Meldrum

Addressing the weather data paradox head-on in Guatemala and Mali

Weather data is vital for climate science, but it is often inaccessible. To solve this, weather stations are being installed in Mali and Guatemala.

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Local solutions for climate change adaptation and coffee rust management in Guatemala

A recent news blog on the CGIAR Research Program on Agriculture and Food Security website highlights urgent need to identify best agroecological...

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Quinoa growing in Bolivia. Credit: Bioversity International/S. Padulosi

New study shows quinoa is good for quinoa farmers

As discussed at length in NPR's The Salt, consumers' quinoa habits benefit not only farmers' incomes but also their nutrition. Bioversity...

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Quinoa varieties conserved by Doña Adeleiva Castillo , a custodian farmer.  She conserves 120 varieties of quinoa on her farm in the Peruvian Andes in memory of her son who died tragically in a motorcycle accident. Please credit:  Bioversity International/A. Camacho

Kai Pacha Foods - Bringing quinoa diversity to the market in Peru

Kai Pacha Foods is a new social enterprise working to bring quinoa diversity to the international market. It uses an innovative approach that...

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Farmer field day in a participatory evaluation plot for kodo millet in Dindori, Madhya Pradesh. Field visit to Mandla and Dindori in Madhya Pradesh to see work carried out by Action for Social Advancement (ASA) in the context of the IFAD-EU-CCAFS project, which is promoting underutilized species, particularly kodo and kutki (little) millet, for better livelihoods. Credit: Bioversity International/G. Meldrum

Agricultural biodiversity to manage risks and empower the poor

Proceedings are now available from an International Conference held in Rome in 2015 to launch the IFAD and EU supported Initiative ‘Linking...

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