Skip to main content

Bioversity International's mission is to deliver scientific evidence, management practices and policy options to use and safeguard agricultural and tree biodiversity to sustainable food and nutrition security.

The Southeast Asia region here refers to the sub-region of Mekong River Basin plus Malay Archipelago and covers the major least developed countries in the world. The region is characterized by diverse ecosystems and landscapes: highlands and low humid tropics with climates varying from the temperate, the sub-tropical to the tropical.

The region is the centre of diversity of many important species of crops (rice, soybean, banana, coconut), animals and livestock with most of its resource-poor smallholder farmers dependent on this agricultural and forest biodiversity for food security and livelihoods.

Bioversity International is working with partners in Cambodia, China, Indonesia, Laos, Philippines and Vietnam where agricultural biodiversity can contribute to improved nutrition, resilience, productivity and climate change adaptation.

Where we work

Cambodia, China, Laos, Indonesia, Philippines and Vietnam

Meet the team

Contact

For details of how to contact our offices in South-east Asia, click here 

Alternatively contact our Regional Representative, South-east Asia: Zongwen Zhang

Papua New Guinea's amazing banana diversity

Papua New Guinea is a hotspot of banana diversity. An expedition to Bougainville by Bioversity International and partners resulted in +60 samples of wild & cultivated bananas added to the national collection.

 

Find out more

 

Local foods – a strategic asset for healthy diets

Deploying the potential of seasonal fruits and vegetables as strategic assets for healthy diets in Kenya, Guatemala, Mali, and Vietnam.
 

Find out how 

Adding nutrition to the food chain in Indonesia

How to diversify diets, improve diet quality and increase smallholder incomes in commercial food systems in five steps.

 

Find out how

Markets for nutritious foods

We are promoting agricultural biodiversity for nutrition and health focused on the value chains of available agricultural biodiversity in production, markets and consumption with partners in China and Vietnam. The participatory action research methodology has been adopted on the assessment of agricultural biodiversity by smallholder farmers, particularly females and will be promoted on banana and underutilized crops such as buckwheat.

Read more

Climate-smart research

We are carrying out research on integrated agricultural technologies for enhanced adaptive capacity and resilient livelihoods in climate-smart villages (CSVs) of Southeast Asia aims to provide climate-smart agriculture options to enhance adaptive capacity among CSV farmers and stakeholders, and contribute to more climate-resilient livelihoods, in selected sites in Cambodia, Lao PDR and Vietnam.

Read more

News from the South-east Asia region

Coconut palm tree, Sri Lanka. Credit: Bioversity International/D.Martinez

Saving the Pacific’s coconuts

Government representatives from Fiji, Papua New Guinea and Samoa are meeting this week to launch a mission, coordinated by Bioversity International...

Read more

Joining the diversity club – how village health workers in Vietnam are putting nutrition back on the menu

In the fifth of her blog reports from Vietnam, Jessica Raneri, Nutrition Programme Specialist, explains how Diversity Clubs in the Mai Son district in...

Read more

Nepali farmers fight to save indigenous seeds

SciDev.Net interviews Bioversity International's Nepal-based Devendra Gauchan, agriculture economist and project manager, about the latest...

Read more

Forests patches on the lower hills of the Himalayas, Nepal. Credit: Bioversity International/G. Meldrum

Making best use of Asia’s tree diversity

Working on landscape restoration, REDD+, tree improvement or conservation planning in Asia-Pacific? Take this survey and tell us what your training...

Read more

Transporting bananas in Uganda. Credit: Bioversity International/N.Capozio

Scientists race to halt banana catastrophe

Scientists, including Bioversity International banana specialists, are scrambling to find a cure for a devastating fungus that threatens to wipe out...

Read more

Workshop to share baseline nutrition data and plan interventions, Vietnam. Credit: Bioversity International/J. Raneri

Putting nutrition data to work in the community

Jessica Raneri sends her fourth blog from Vietnam, where we are working with local communities to improve nutrition through dietary diversity.

Read more

Women and children planting native fruit tree species on communal land in Mandla, Madhya Pradesh, India. Credit: IORA Ecological Solutions Ltd.

Seeds for Restoration - a global survey calls for contributions

Restoring hundreds of millions of hectares of degraded forestlands will require billions of tree seeds and seedlings. This month, we invite...

Read more

Pilot testing of the priority setting methodology in Ma village, Vietnam. Credit: Bioversity International/R.Vernooy

New six-step methodology employs farmers’ knowledge and experiences to determine research priorities

Bioversity International’s scientist Ronnie Vernooy blogs about a new six-step methodology that facilitates participatory processes with men and women...

Read more

One of the three winning photos from the Women and Agricultural Biodiversity Photo Contest. While visiting a friend in the Sitio Damog area, Barangay Sumilihon, Butuan City, Philippines, a local woman named Amalia Sumabat caught my attention. She is plowing her land with the help of a water buffalo (Carabao) in preparation for planting different kind of vegetables: the traditional way of farming in the Philippines. Credit: A. Gomez

Plowing with buffaloes in the Philippines - an interview with one of the photo contest winners

One of our photo contest winners, Alexis Gomez, a passionate photographer, tells us about women's role in traditional farming in the Philippines.

Read more

final stage of turning sap from the tree into yuro (flour), enough to feed her community for a week. All the materials, including the Pugahan trunk, used for the laborious production are naturally-sourced. Aranta is one of the few remaining Pugahan ritualists observing traditional ways in producing food. Credit: L. Astese

The sacredness of the Pugahan tree - an interview with one of the photo contest winners

Leonora Astete tells a story of agricultural rituals, describing in detail a very rare Filipino practice to produce flour from a tree’s sap.

Read more