Biodiversity and nutrition

In Connecting global priorities: biodiversity and human health: a state of knowledge review. (Romanelli, C. et al.)

Malnutrition remains one of the greatest global health challenges we face and women and children are its most visible and vulnerable victims. Agricultural production is theoretically able to feed the world’s population in terms of calories (FAOSTAT, 2014), yet it is estimated that half the world’s population still suffers from one or more forms of malnutrition. In all its forms, malnutrition is closely linked to disease – as both a cause and effect  – and it is the single largest contributor to the global burden of disease (WHO 2012a)

Authors:
Hunter, D.; Burlingame, B.; Remans, R.; Borelli, T.; Cogill, B.; Coradin, L.; Golden, C.D.; Jamnadass, R.; Kehlenbeck, K.; Kennedy, G.; Kuhnlein, H.; McMullin, S.; Myers, S.; Silva, A.J.R.; Saha, M.; Scheerer, L.; Shackleton, C.; Neves Soares Oliveira, C.; Termote, C.; Teofili, C.; Thilsted, S.; Valenti, R.
Journal/Series:
In Connecting global priorities: biodiversity and human health: a state of knowledge review. (Romanelli, C. et al.)
Pages:
p. 97-127
Publisher:
World Health Organisation; Secretariat of the UN Convention on Biological Diversity
Publication Year:
2015
Publication Format:
PDF
ISBN 13:
978-92-4-150853-7
Language:
EN
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