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BBC Radio 4 highlights why crop diversity matters for feeding India

Minor millets, India. Credit: Bioversity International/S. Padulosi

BBC Radio 4's Food Programme this week interviews Bioversity International scientist Stefano Padulosi. He explains why bringing back 'forgotten' traditional foods like millets is vital when it comes to a food-secure future for India, predicted to become the world's most populous country by 2022.

BBC Radio 4's Food Programme this week features an interview with Bioversity International scientist Stefano Padulosi.

He explains why bringing back 'forgotten' traditional foods like millets is vital when it comes to a food-secure future for India, predicted to become the world's most populous country by 2022.

Nutritious millets were once a strong part of traditional diets in Southern India but have since become a 'forgotten food.' Additionally, millet grains are rich in a variety of vitamins, have a low glycemic index, and contain antioxidants. In 2013, millets were incorporated into India's National Food Security Act, meaning these nutritious grains are now available to more than 800 million people at a subsidized rate.

Listen to the Radio 4's Food Programme:
Feeding India

Bioversity International has been working with partners for 15 years to promote millet use and conservation in India.  Read more here

Photo: Minor millets, India. Credit: Bioversity International/S. Padulosi

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