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To feed nine billion people by 2050, food availability needs to expand another 60% globally and up to 100% in developing countries. Continued investments in research on staple grains are essential as these crops will continue to provide a large share of global calories, but complementary approaches are needed to meet new global challenges:

  • Reduce global malnutrition
  • Adapt to climate change
  • Increase productivity and reduce risk
  • Address shrinking food diversity

Using and safeguarding agricultural and tree biodiversity can help meet these challenges.

Farm households and rural communities have long since used agricultural and tree biodiversity to diversify their diets, and to manage pests, diseases and weather-related stress. In the past however, policymakers and researchers considered these approaches economically uncompetitive.

More recently, scientific evidence has demonstrated that agricultural and tree biodiversity, used in combination with novel technologies and approaches, has much to offer in addressing these challenges.  It is also being increasingly recognized as a tool to achieve the global sustainable development goals.

Bioversity International Initiatives

Partners

We work with partners in low-income countries in different regions where agricultural and tree biodiversity can contribute to improved nutrition, resilience, productivity and climate change adaptation.

We are also a member of the CGIAR Consortium, a global partnership for a food-secure future. 

Meet our partners

Contact:

Deputy Director General - Research
Stephan Weise

Who we are

Bioversity International's vision is that agricultural biodiversity nourishes people and sustains the planet.

Our mission is to deliver scientific evidence, management practices and policy options to use and safeguard agricultural and tree biodiversity to attain sustainable global food and nutrition security.

Our research portfolio

Find out more

Colourful display of fruits on sale at traditional market in Indonesia. Credit: Bioversity International/F. De La Cruz

Agricultural biodiversity matters

Find out why

News:

Different tubers on display at a diversity fair, Peru. Credit: Bioversity International/A.Drucker

How is agrobiodiversity faring in Peru?

Did you know that Peru is one of the main centres of crop diversity in the world? A recent study conducted by Bioversity International sets the stage...

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Strengthening farmers' seed systems in China

Dr. Yiching Song, Senior Researcher at the Center for Chinese Agricultural Policy, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Dr. Ronnie Vernooy, Senior...

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Local agrobiodiversity in Guatemala. Credit: Bioversity International/R. Robitaille

One thousand and ninety seven reasons to celebrate World Food Day

In her World Food Day blog, Ann Tutwiler, Director General, Bioversity International draws attention to the thousands of overlooked food...

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Nepalese women applying manure in household fields to restore soil fertility. Credit: Bioversity International/M. Elias

A closer look at gender relations in forest landscape restoration

On the occasion of the International Day of Rural Women, Giulia Micheletti and Marlène Elias from Bioversity International discuss a framework on how...

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Latest publications:

Implementing the Plant Treaty’s multilateral system of access and benefit-sharing in Rwanda: Background analysis, recommendations and draft legal text for consideration

The study analyzes options for implementing the Plant Treaty's multilateral system of access and benefit-sharing in Rwanda.

The study includes an...

Authors:
Turamwishimiye, M.R.; Gapusi, J.R.
Publication Year:
2018
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Herramienta de toma de decisiones para la implementacion nacional del sistema multilateral de acceso y distribucion de beneficios del Tratado Internacional sobre los Recursos Fitogeneticos

This decision making tool is designed to assist national policy makers and other stakeholders to identify appropriate measures to implement the Plant...

Publication Year:
2018
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Understanding the economic impact of BXW and its management practices in East and Central Africa

Banana Xanthomonas wilt (BXW) is a widespread banana disease in East and Central Africa (ECA). It has the ability to cause up to 100% yield loss,...

Authors:
Di Cori, V.; Kikulwe, E.; Kozicka, M.; Gotor, E.
Publication Year:
2018
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