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To feed nine billion people by 2050, food availability needs to expand another 60% globally and up to 100% in developing countries. Continued investments in research on staple grains are essential as these crops will continue to provide a large share of global calories, but complementary approaches are needed to meet new global challenges:

  • Reduce global malnutrition
  • Adapt to climate change
  • Increase productivity and reduce risk
  • Address shrinking food diversity

Using and safeguarding agricultural and tree biodiversity can help meet these challenges.

Farm households and rural communities have long since used agricultural and tree biodiversity to diversify their diets, and to manage pests, diseases and weather-related stress. In the past however, policymakers and researchers considered these approaches economically uncompetitive.

More recently, scientific evidence has demonstrated that agricultural and tree biodiversity, used in combination with novel technologies and approaches, has much to offer in addressing these challenges.  It is also being increasingly recognized as a tool to achieve the global sustainable development goals.

Bioversity International Initiatives

Partners

We work with partners in low-income countries in different regions where agricultural and tree biodiversity can contribute to improved nutrition, resilience, productivity and climate change adaptation.

We are also a member of the CGIAR Consortium, a global partnership for a food-secure future. 

Meet our partners

Contact:

Deputy Director General - Research
Stephan Weise

Who we are

Bioversity International's vision is that agricultural biodiversity nourishes people and sustains the planet.

Our mission is to deliver scientific evidence, management practices and policy options to use and safeguard agricultural and tree biodiversity to attain sustainable global food and nutrition security.

Our research portfolio

Find out more

Colourful display of fruits on sale at traditional market in Indonesia. Credit: Bioversity International/F. De La Cruz

Agricultural biodiversity matters

Find out why

News:

Wheat varieties grown as part of crowdsourcing trials in India. Credit: Bioversity International/T.Rastogi

Farmer science accelerates climate adaptation

A new study in PNAS addresses the challenge of climate adaptation in a way that is both scalable and targeted. Scientists demonstrate a unique...

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Celebrating women in science

Join us in celebrating the International Day of Women and Girls in Science! On this occasion Bioversity International and CIAT feature some of our...

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The Great Food Transformation

Launched today, the EAT-Lancet Commission on Healthy Diets from Sustainable Food Systems sets out proposed global scientific targets to drive the...

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A global community seedbank platform

Genetic Resources Policy Specialist, Ronnie Vernooy, discusses how Bioversity International and partners tackle the need for greater connectivity...

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Latest publications:

Forest biodiversity monitoring: Guide to community-based approaches

This guideline focuses on CBM of forest biodiversity – the diversity of species and their genetic resources that form the basis of growth,...

Authors:
Welter, Z.; Jalonen, R.
Publication Year:
2019
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Income growth and climate change effects on global nutrition security to mid-century

Authors:
Nelson, G.; Bogard, J.; Lividini, K.; Arsenault, J.; Riley, M.; Sulser, T.B.; Mason-D’Croz, D.; Power, B.; Gustafson, D.; Herrero, M.; Wiebe, K.; Cooper, K.; Remans, R.; Rosegrant, M.
Publication Year:
2018
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Trade and the equitability of global food nutrient distribution

Authors:
Wood, S.A.; Smith, M.R.; Fanzo, J.; Remans, R.; DeFries, R.S.
Publication Year:
2018
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