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To feed nine billion people by 2050, food availability needs to expand another 60% globally and up to 100% in developing countries. Continued investments in research on staple grains are essential as these crops will continue to provide a large share of global calories, but complementary approaches are needed to meet new global challenges:

  • Reduce global malnutrition
  • Adapt to climate change
  • Increase productivity and reduce risk
  • Address shrinking food diversity

Using and safeguarding agricultural and tree biodiversity can help meet these challenges.

Farm households and rural communities have long since used agricultural and tree biodiversity to diversify their diets, and to manage pests, diseases and weather-related stress. In the past however, policymakers and researchers considered these approaches economically uncompetitive.

More recently, scientific evidence has demonstrated that agricultural and tree biodiversity, used in combination with novel technologies and approaches, has much to offer in addressing these challenges.  It is also being increasingly recognized as a tool to achieve the global sustainable development goals.

Bioversity International Initiatives

Partners

We work with partners in low-income countries in different regions where agricultural and tree biodiversity can contribute to improved nutrition, resilience, productivity and climate change adaptation.

We are also a member of the CGIAR Consortium, a global partnership for a food-secure future. 

Meet our partners

Contact:

Deputy Director General - Research
Stephan Weise

Who we are

Bioversity International's vision is that agricultural biodiversity nourishes people and sustains the planet.

Our mission is to deliver scientific evidence, management practices and policy options to use and safeguard agricultural and tree biodiversity to attain sustainable global food and nutrition security.

Our research portfolio

Find out more

Colourful display of fruits on sale at traditional market in Indonesia. Credit: Bioversity International/F. De La Cruz

Agricultural biodiversity matters

Find out why

News:

A closer look at gender relations in forest landscape restoration

On the occasion of the International Day of Rural Women, Giulia Micheletti and Marlène Elias from Bioversity International discuss a framework on how...

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Focus group with Thai men in north-west Vietnam Credit: Institute for Social Development Studies/Van Anh Nguyen

Using vignettes to explore gender issues related to food security and nutrition

Giulia Micheletti, Marlène Elias, and Jessica Raneri of Bioversity International describe a nutrition-sensitive version of GENNOVATE, in which a...

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Hedge your bets in resilient landscape restoration

Bioversity International launched the Trees for Seeds: Resilient forest restoration initiative at the Global Landscapes Forum one month ago in...

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More than a thousand vegetables, many of them forgotten

Bioversity International and partners reveal that most of the world's vegetable species are poorly documented, and present a study and database with...

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Latest publications:

Understanding gender roles and practices in innovation processes

Banana Xanthomonas wilt (BXW) is a bacterial banana disease that threatens household income and food security in Burundi. Single disease stem removal...

Authors:
Iradukunda, F.; Bullock, R; Rietveld, A.; van Schagen, B.
Publication Year:
2018
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Women's hidden harvest

Indigenous vegetables and amaXhosa cultural survival in Hobeni Village, South Africa

Authors:
Tavenner, K.
Publication Year:
2018
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East African diploid and triploid bananas: a genetic complex transported from South-East Asia

All the edible AA varieties studied here are genetically homogeneous, constituting a unique subgroup, here called ‘Mchare’, despite high phenotypic...

Authors:
Perrier, X.; Jenny, C.; Bakry, F.; Karamura, D.; Kitavi, M.; Dubois, C.; Hervouet, C.; Philippson, G.; De Langhe, E.
Publication Year:
2018
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